History

History

Our school is named in honor of and inspired by Monseñor Oscar Romero. During his three years as archbishop of San Salvador, Oscar Romero became known as a fearless defender of the poor and suffering during El Salvador‘s civil war in the 1980s. His work on behalf of the oppressed earned him the admiration and love of the people of El Salvador. In 1980, amidst overarching violence, rather than shrink under the increasingly intense repression, Romero used his nationally broadcast Sunday homilies to report on conditions in the country and ―plead for sanity, for an end to the repression, and that the root causes of the conflict — the country’s deeply rooted structures of economic injustice — be addressed in favor of the majority poor who are also the chief victims of the government’s violence. Romero wrote to President Jimmy Carter pleading with him to cease sending military aid because he wrote, “it is being used to repress my people.” He was killed in 1981 while giving mass.

Monseñor Oscar Romero Charter School equips low-income students in grades 6-8 for academic success and active community participation. The school is located in the Pico Union/Westlake community, an area fraught with poverty and academically struggling students. The majority of students attending schools in this area come from Central American immigrant families where Spanish is spoken in their home. Monseñor Oscar Romero Charter School seeks to close the achievement gap for these students by providing clear and high expectations for all students, a personalized and supportive learning environment that recognizes students‘ accomplishments, family-school-community partnerships and service, and integrated technology in the classroom with culturally enriched curriculum.